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Sibling Relationships in Rural African American Families

Gene H. Brody, Zolinda Stoneman, Trellis Smith and Nicole Morgan Gibson
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 61, No. 4 (Nov., 1999), pp. 1046-1057
DOI: 10.2307/354023
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/354023
Page Count: 12
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Sibling Relationships in Rural African American Families
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Abstract

A family process model linked mothers' and fathers' psychological functioning to sibling relationship quality in a sample of 85 9- to 12-year-old African American youths and their married parents living in the rural Southeastern United States. Members of the rural African American community participated in the development of the research methods. Better parental psychological functioning was linked to closer and more supportive relationships in the nuclear and extended families and with more supportive parenting practices. In turn, these family processes were linked with children's development of self-regulation. Self-regulated youths experienced more harmonious and less conflicted sibling relationships.

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