Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Timing and Amount of Bird Migration in Relation to Weather: A Review

W. John Richardson
Oikos
Vol. 30, No. 2, Current Bird Migration Research. Proceedings of a Symposium at Falsterbo, Sweden, 3-8 October, 1977 (1978), pp. 224-272
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos
DOI: 10.2307/3543482
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3543482
Page Count: 50
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Timing and Amount of Bird Migration in Relation to Weather: A Review
Preview not available

Abstract

Relationships of short-term weather to daily migration intensity are reviewed, with sections for each weather variable, for waterfowl, shorebirds and hawks, and for reverse migration. Selecting factors, methodology, hypotheses and results to date are summarized, generalizations about migration-weather relationships are extracted from the pooled results, and high-priority research topics are identified. Ultimate factors responsible for present responses are thought to include aspects of weather en route and a the take-off point and destination. Proximate factors affecting the probability of take-off may include variables useful in predicting, as well as those that measure, aspects of weather with selective significance. Causative and coincidental relationships remain difficult to separate, and at least a few birds migrate in almost any weather conditions. However, maximum numbers migrate with fair weather, with tailwinds and with temperature, pressure and humidity conditions that accompany tailwinds. Correlations with weather differ among populations with different flight directions. General patterns of responses appear to be modified by special selecting factors that apply to certain groups - soaring hawks tend to fly on days with strong updrafts, landbirds migrating along coasts prefer onshore to offshore winds, and transients in unsuitable habitats seem less likely to wait for favourable travelling conditions. /// дан обзор взаимосвязи погодных усповий и иитенсивности суточных миграпий с раздепами, посвященными анализу впияния отдельных погодных факторов на миграции водоплавающих, береговых и хищных птиц и на обратные мнграции. Обобщены сепеютирукщие факторы, методопогия, гипотезы и результаты, имеющиеся в настоящее время, сдепаны выводы о взаимосвязях миграции-погода, на основании имеющихся материапов определены генералвные направюения иччледований. Предполагается, что ультимативные фактопы, определяющие эти отношения, включают характер погоды по маршруту миграции, а также в точках отлета и назначения. Непосредственное влияние на отлет могут оказывать различные аспекты погоды, которые можно измерить ипи предсказать: отдельные факторы имеюь различную значимость. Причинные и сопутсвующие связи трудно разделить и, по крайней мере, некоторые птицы мигрируют при погодных условиях. Однако, максимальное количество птиц мигрирует при хорошей погоде, попутном ветре и соответствующих температурах, атмосферном давлении и влажности. Основной характер взаимосвязей может модифицироваться специальными фактояами, которые имеюь значение для некоторых хищников, парящих группами и предпочитающих дни с сильными вертикальными токами, а также у сухопутных птиц, мигрирующих вдопь берега и предпочитающих ветер с моря береговому бризу, и наконец, у перелетных птиц, оказывающихчя на пролете в неподходящих местообитаниях, которые не дожидаются наиболее благоприятных условий для перелета.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
224
    224
  • Thumbnail: Page 
225
    225
  • Thumbnail: Page 
226
    226
  • Thumbnail: Page 
227
    227
  • Thumbnail: Page 
228
    228
  • Thumbnail: Page 
229
    229
  • Thumbnail: Page 
230
    230
  • Thumbnail: Page 
231
    231
  • Thumbnail: Page 
232
    232
  • Thumbnail: Page 
233
    233
  • Thumbnail: Page 
234
    234
  • Thumbnail: Page 
235
    235
  • Thumbnail: Page 
236
    236
  • Thumbnail: Page 
237
    237
  • Thumbnail: Page 
238
    238
  • Thumbnail: Page 
239
    239
  • Thumbnail: Page 
240
    240
  • Thumbnail: Page 
241
    241
  • Thumbnail: Page 
242
    242
  • Thumbnail: Page 
243
    243
  • Thumbnail: Page 
244
    244
  • Thumbnail: Page 
245
    245
  • Thumbnail: Page 
246
    246
  • Thumbnail: Page 
247
    247
  • Thumbnail: Page 
248
    248
  • Thumbnail: Page 
249
    249
  • Thumbnail: Page 
250
    250
  • Thumbnail: Page 
251
    251
  • Thumbnail: Page 
252
    252
  • Thumbnail: Page 
253
    253
  • Thumbnail: Page 
254
    254
  • Thumbnail: Page 
255
    255
  • Thumbnail: Page 
256
    256
  • Thumbnail: Page 
257
    257
  • Thumbnail: Page 
258
    258
  • Thumbnail: Page 
259
    259
  • Thumbnail: Page 
260
    260
  • Thumbnail: Page 
261
    261
  • Thumbnail: Page 
262
    262
  • Thumbnail: Page 
263
    263
  • Thumbnail: Page 
264
    264
  • Thumbnail: Page 
265
    265
  • Thumbnail: Page 
266
    266
  • Thumbnail: Page 
267
    267
  • Thumbnail: Page 
268
    268
  • Thumbnail: Page 
269
    269
  • Thumbnail: Page 
270
    270
  • Thumbnail: Page 
271
    271
  • Thumbnail: Page 
272
    272
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[unnumbered]
    [unnumbered]