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Empirical Evidence of Non-Correlation between Tail Loss Frequency and Predation Intensity on Lizards

Fabian M. Jaksić and Harry W. Greene
Oikos
Vol. 42, No. 3 (Mar., 1984), pp. 407-411
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos
DOI: 10.2307/3544414
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3544414
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Empirical Evidence of Non-Correlation between Tail Loss Frequency and Predation Intensity on Lizards
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Abstract

We examined the widespread assumption that tail loss frequency in lizards is positively correlated with predation intensity. Empirical data from a California locality show that no correlation exists. We suggest that tail loss frequencies are more likely to reflect the inefficiency of predators rather than the intensity of predation. Previous conclusions based on tail loss data regarding the effect of predators on behavioral, population, and community phenomena in lizards are consequently suspect.

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