Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Patterns of Resource Allocation in Fleshy Fruits of Nine European Tall-Shrub Species

William G. Lee, Peter J. Grubb and J. Bastow Wilson
Oikos
Vol. 61, No. 3 (Sep., 1991), pp. 307-315
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos
DOI: 10.2307/3545238
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3545238
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Patterns of Resource Allocation in Fleshy Fruits of Nine European Tall-Shrub Species
Preview not available

Abstract

Within-fruit reproductive allocation was studied in the nine major fleshy-fruited shrub species of southern England. The partitioning of dry mass and nitrogen between flesh and stone, and between the fibrous coat of the stone and the embryo-cum-endosperm, was determined, together with the water proportion in each fraction. Mean allocation to flesh was 55% of the fruit dry mass. This did not vary with fruit size over an order of magnitude in total dry mass and a range of 1-26 in number of seeds per fruit. Nitrogen concentration was generally lower in the flesh than the stone (mean ratio 0.56:1), and there was a markedly smaller nitrogen allocation to flesh in larger fruits. Within the stone, the allocation of dry mass to fibrous coat varied from <5% to 89%. Thick coats are characteristic of species showing delayed germination, and were found in five of the six species most often invading non-woody vegetation. The highest nitrogen concentrations in the embryo-cum-endosperm fraction were found in the species most often establishing in a grass turf. The fibrous coat generally had a very low nitrogen concentration compared with other fruit structures. The problems of interpreting the results are discussed in relation to possible phylogenetic inertia and only loose co-evolution between plants with fleshy fruits and their dispersers.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
307
    307
  • Thumbnail: Page 
308
    308
  • Thumbnail: Page 
309
    309
  • Thumbnail: Page 
310
    310
  • Thumbnail: Page 
311
    311
  • Thumbnail: Page 
312
    312
  • Thumbnail: Page 
313
    313
  • Thumbnail: Page 
314
    314
  • Thumbnail: Page 
315
    315