Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Life-History Patterns in Metal-Adapted Collembola

Leo Posthuma, Rudo A. Verweij, Budi Widianarko and Cor Zonneveld
Oikos
Vol. 67, No. 2 (Jun., 1993), pp. 235-249
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos
DOI: 10.2307/3545468
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3545468
Page Count: 15
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Life-History Patterns in Metal-Adapted Collembola
Preview not available

Abstract

Life-history theory predicts that pollutants can be selective agents which mould life-history patterns. Pollution-mediated decreased adult survival and reproductive success was expected to induce earlier maturation and an increased reproductive allocation per clutch. Divergence of life-history patterns in relation to metal exposure was studied in reference and metal-tolerant natural populations of the springtail species Orchesella cincta. Mortality, growth and reproduction were analysed in laboratory generation animals originating from six sites. The dose-effect relationship for mortality was similar for all populations, except for the control and the lowest exposure concentration. For animals from highly polluted sites, control mortality was higher than mortality in the low exposed group. Inter-population differences with regard to growth and reproduction were studied using two cadmium exposure levels. Body growth was analysed using Von Bertalanffy's growth model. Inter-population differences for asymptotic weight and growth rate were small. Asymptotic weight depended on sex and treatment, growth rate also depended on population. Inter-population differences were highest for post-hatching body weight. Juvenile body weight was highest and least affected by cadmium in animals from metal-contaminated sites. Female weight at first reproduction depended on population and exposure. Age at first reproduction was lowest in the most exposed populations. Clutch size differences were not found, but realized fertility was higher in exposed populations, since more clutches per female were produced. It is concluded that life-history patterns in O. cincta differ between populations which have experienced a different duration and intensity of metal exposure. As the differences were found in laboratory generation animals, there is evidence for genetic differences between populations.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
235
    235
  • Thumbnail: Page 
236
    236
  • Thumbnail: Page 
237
    237
  • Thumbnail: Page 
238
    238
  • Thumbnail: Page 
239
    239
  • Thumbnail: Page 
240
    240
  • Thumbnail: Page 
241
    241
  • Thumbnail: Page 
242
    242
  • Thumbnail: Page 
243
    243
  • Thumbnail: Page 
244
    244
  • Thumbnail: Page 
245
    245
  • Thumbnail: Page 
246
    246
  • Thumbnail: Page 
247
    247
  • Thumbnail: Page 
248
    248
  • Thumbnail: Page 
249
    249