Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

A Spatial Mechanism for the Evolution and Maintenance of Sexual Reproduction

M. J. Keeling and D. A. Rand
Oikos
Vol. 74, No. 3 (Dec., 1995), pp. 414-424
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos
DOI: 10.2307/3545986
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3545986
Page Count: 11
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Spatial Mechanism for the Evolution and Maintenance of Sexual Reproduction
Preview not available

Abstract

In this paper we discuss a spatial mechanism for the evolution and maintenance of sexual reproduction. We consider three related models in which sexual reproduction is maintained by parasitism despite the twofold reproductive advantage to pathenogenic females. These models take into account the fact that the populations are spatially extended and that the effective local population size is relatively small. They do not rely on the deterministic cycling of genotypes but on the dynamically produced local stochastic genetic variation. The primary model is a probabilistic cellular automaton. In this, for a wide range of parasite mutation rates, the parasites maintain a spatially genetically heterogeneous population of sexuals and this allows the sexuals to overcome the twofold advantage of asexuals because parasites and their adaptation are much less effective in a stochastic spatial genetic structure. We also consider the case where the sexuality rate S (the proportion of the time the host breeds sexually) is slowly evolving. With such slow mutation, we find that both sexual (S=1) and asexual (S=0) populations are evolutionarily stable. We examine two other models which allow us to consider the mathematical conditions under which the advantage of this spatial genetic structure overcomes the twofold advantage of asexual reproduction.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
414
    414
  • Thumbnail: Page 
415
    415
  • Thumbnail: Page 
416
    416
  • Thumbnail: Page 
417
    417
  • Thumbnail: Page 
418
    418
  • Thumbnail: Page 
419
    419
  • Thumbnail: Page 
420
    420
  • Thumbnail: Page 
421
    421
  • Thumbnail: Page 
422
    422
  • Thumbnail: Page 
423
    423
  • Thumbnail: Page 
424
    424