Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Spatial and Temporal Variation in Guild Structure: Parasitoids and Inquilines of Andricus quercuscalicis (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) in Its Native and Alien Ranges

Karsten Schönrogge, Graham N. Stone and Michael J. Crawley
Oikos
Vol. 72, No. 1 (Feb., 1995), pp. 51-60
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos
DOI: 10.2307/3546037
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3546037
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Spatial and Temporal Variation in Guild Structure: Parasitoids and Inquilines of Andricus quercuscalicis (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) in Its Native and Alien Ranges
Preview not available

Abstract

The communities associated with the invading gall wasp Andricus quercuscalicis vary considerably in species richness and species composition throughout its native and invaded ranges. Seventeen species of inquilines and parasitoids were identified as coinhabitants of the agamic galls of Andricus quercuscalicis throughout Europe. The life-histories of the parasitoid species are described; one is a solitary endoparasitoid, one a gregarious endoparasitoid and the remainder are solitary ectoparasitoids. A tortricid moth which develops as an inquiline in the agamic galls of A. quercuscalicis kills the gall causer; this is the first description of such an interaction between moths and cynipids. While some parasitoid species appear to be restricted in their attack to the native range of A. quercuscalicis, others were found throughout the range. Geographic variation in the species composition and the possible role of the invasion history of the host are discussed. Food web parameters calculated for the community from the native range and six regions across the invaded range appear to be correlated with the residence time of the invading host, in accordance with studies of successional communities. However, it might be impossible to separate effects of time from those of species richness.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
51
    51
  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52
  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53
  • Thumbnail: Page 
54
    54
  • Thumbnail: Page 
55
    55
  • Thumbnail: Page 
56
    56
  • Thumbnail: Page 
57
    57
  • Thumbnail: Page 
58
    58
  • Thumbnail: Page 
59
    59
  • Thumbnail: Page 
60
    60