Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Dynamics of Age- and Habitat-Structured Populations

Michael A. Bowers
Oikos
Vol. 69, No. 2 (Mar., 1994), pp. 327-333
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos
DOI: 10.2307/3546154
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3546154
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Dynamics of Age- and Habitat-Structured Populations
Preview not available

Abstract

Traditional approaches to modeling population dynamics assume that individual performance (i.e., fecundity and survivorship) varies principally according to age/size, and that individuals occupy similar environments. Such an approach is more epiphenomenal than process oriented because performance may vary more between same-aged individuals living in different habitats than between different-aged individuals in the same habitat. One issue addressed in this paper is whether demographic status can legitimately be used as a first-order approximation of individual fecundity/survival. Another is whether age-structured populations exhibit different population dynamics than those structured by habitat. Computer simulations using population projection matrices showed age-structured populations to be more variable and to experience extinction more frequently than habitat-structured populations. This reflects differences in spatio-temporal processes underlying individual performance: in populations structured by habitat, individuals have the ability of changing performance simply by changing habitats, while in age-structured populations performance can only be changed through aging. One means of incorporating habitat structure into demographic analyses is through the use of submodels that account for the distribution of individuals among habitats, followed by habitat-specific analyses of demographics.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
327
    327
  • Thumbnail: Page 
328
    328
  • Thumbnail: Page 
329
    329
  • Thumbnail: Page 
330
    330
  • Thumbnail: Page 
331
    331
  • Thumbnail: Page 
332
    332
  • Thumbnail: Page 
333
    333