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Fitness Variation in an Invading Parthenogenetic Cockroach

Monica Niklasson and E. Davis Parker, Jr.
Oikos
Vol. 71, No. 1 (Oct., 1994), pp. 47-54
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos
DOI: 10.2307/3546171
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3546171
Page Count: 8
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Fitness Variation in an Invading Parthenogenetic Cockroach
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Abstract

Many parthenogenetic species are geographically more widely distributed and ecologically broader than their sexual relatives. This success in colonizing and invading abilities has been attributed in part to the existance of broadly adaptable genotypes which are able to survive and reproduce in unpredictable environments. Here we test the hypothesis that successful invading clones of the parthenogenetic cockroach, Pycnoscelus surinamensis, are such general purpose genotypes by comparing lifetime fertility and adult viability across four temperatures among six clones of P. surinamensis and its sexual ancestor, P. indicus. There is significant heterogeneity among genotypes and/or temperatures for longevity, lifetime number of offspring and age at first brood. Some have extreme longevities at low temperatures, suggesting the presence of "stowaway" genotypes. One of these clones also has the highest reproduction at all temperatures. Females of the sexual species and many of the clones have both low survivorship and reproduction at lower temperatures. The results suggest that there is no one set of life history traits with respect to temperature tolerance that characterize all of the successfully invading clones.

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