Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Damage Tolerance and Cotyledonary Resource Use in the Tropical tree Gustavia superba

J. W. Dalling and Kyle E. Harms
Oikos
Vol. 85, No. 2 (May, 1999), pp. 257-264
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos
DOI: 10.2307/3546491
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3546491
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Damage Tolerance and Cotyledonary Resource Use in the Tropical tree Gustavia superba
Preview not available

Abstract

Explanations for the extremely large seed size of some tropical forest plants are currently lacking. In this study we examine cotyledonary resource use of the tropical tree Gustavia superba, and test whether tolerance to damage of either seeds or establishing seedlings might be an important function leading to, or maintaining, its large (> 5 g) seed reserves. We found that seeds of Gustavia were both tolerant of insect infestation and were also capable of successful germination after removal of half of their cotyledonary reserves. Simulated complete above-ground herbivory resulted in repeated resprouting (up to 8 times). Resprout shoots were constructed of a small, but fixed proportion of remaining cotyledonary mass regardless of seed size. In the absence of damage, cotyledon reserves were used for onward seedling growth; however, conversion of cotyledon resources was slow, lasting several months. Given high rates of damage to Gustavia seeds and seedlings in the field, and the apparent use of cotyledonary reserves to tolerate or recover from it in growing house experiments, we conclude that cotyledonary seed size and morphology in this species is adaptive in surviving pre- and early post-germination hazards.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
257
    257
  • Thumbnail: Page 
258
    258
  • Thumbnail: Page 
259
    259
  • Thumbnail: Page 
260
    260
  • Thumbnail: Page 
261
    261
  • Thumbnail: Page 
262
    262
  • Thumbnail: Page 
263
    263
  • Thumbnail: Page 
264
    264