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On the Implications of Species-Area Relationships for Endemism, Spatial Turnover, and Food Web Patterns

J. Harte and A. P. Kinzig
Oikos
Vol. 80, No. 3 (Dec., 1997), pp. 417-427
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos
DOI: 10.2307/3546614
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3546614
Page Count: 11
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On the Implications of Species-Area Relationships for Endemism, Spatial Turnover, and Food Web Patterns
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Abstract

Consequences of species-area relationships (SARs) of the form S=cAz are derived. One consequence is an endemics-area relationship (EAR); it is of the same power-law form as the SAR but with an exponent z′ that is a function only of z and that always exceeds unity. An explicit formula is derived for the dependence of species turnover in space on census plot size, interplot distance, and the SAR exponent z; this formula can be used to determine z over spatial scales that are too large to permit direct estimate of z by censusing of nested patches. The areal dependence of link-species patterns observed in food webs is also examined; SARs are shown to imply the approximate, but not exact, area-independence of link-species relationships of the form L=kSy, where L is the number of trophic links and y ≤ 2. A relationship between the average range of species in a habitat patch and the exponent z is also derived, leading to the result that average range is a decreasing function of both patch area and z.

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