Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Seasonal Compensation of Predation and Harvesting

Mark S. Boyce, A. R. E. Sinclair and Gary C. White
Oikos
Vol. 87, No. 3 (Dec., 1999), pp. 419-426
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos
DOI: 10.2307/3546808
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3546808
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Seasonal Compensation of Predation and Harvesting
Preview not available

Abstract

Compensatory mortality or natality can operate as a consequence of seasonally driven mechanisms of density dependence. Our objective is to clarify the relationship between compensation and density dependence in population models for vertebrates when seasonality is present. Field studies of a variety of species have demonstrated that due to compensation, predation or human harvest may not influence spring-breeding or pre-harvest-season densities. Compensation seems to contradict most harvesting and predation models because these models predict that harvests or predation will always reduce equilibrium population size. In these population models sustainable harvests are attainable because of density dependence. The apparent discrepancy is attributable to the failure of most population models to incorporate the details of environmental seasonality. We review seasonally explicit models of population dynamics to illustrate how density dependence is the mechanism behind compensatory mortality and natality. Even though spring-breeding or pre-season densities can remain unaffected or even increased by harvesting, harvesting or predation generally reduces the integral of population size. Compensatory mortality and natality are often cited as the basis for sustainable harvests of wildlife populations.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
419
    419
  • Thumbnail: Page 
420
    420
  • Thumbnail: Page 
421
    421
  • Thumbnail: Page 
422
    422
  • Thumbnail: Page 
423
    423
  • Thumbnail: Page 
424
    424
  • Thumbnail: Page 
425
    425
  • Thumbnail: Page 
426
    426