Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Effects of Isolation on the Occurrence of a Fungivorous Forest Beetle, Bolitotherus cornutus, at Different Spatial Scales in Fragmented and Continuous Forests

Daniel Kehler and Søren Bondrup-Nielsen
Oikos
Vol. 84, No. 1 (Jan., 1999), pp. 35-43
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos
DOI: 10.2307/3546864
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3546864
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Effects of Isolation on the Occurrence of a Fungivorous Forest Beetle, Bolitotherus cornutus, at Different Spatial Scales in Fragmented and Continuous Forests
Preview not available

Abstract

We investigated the effect of spatial isolation on the incidence of a fungivorous forest beetle in continuous and fragmented forests at three spatial scales, while controlling for confounding variables, such as patch size and quality. Isolation was measured using nearest-neighbour distances and we compared the usefulness of measuring multiple patches and considering either occupied or unoccupied patches. An effect of spatial isolation on beetle incidence was evident at all three scales: between fungal carps on a log (0 to 2 m), between carp clusters in a forest (1 to 71 m) and between woodlots in an agricultural matrix (25 to 200 m). The magnitude of the isolation effect was stronger at the largest scale than at the smallest scale. However, isolation was most prevalent (i.e. significant for all measures of isolation) at the intermediate scale. The effect of isolation was not influenced by forest configuration type (continuous or fragmented) or by patch density, but there was a marginal compensatory effect of patch size on isolation. Isolation measures incorporating only occupied patches were not generally better predictors than isolation measures incorporating all patches. Little information would have been lost by using only the distance to the closest patch to measure isolation effects, rather than incorporating distances to multiple patches.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
35
    35
  • Thumbnail: Page 
36
    36
  • Thumbnail: Page 
37
    37
  • Thumbnail: Page 
38
    38
  • Thumbnail: Page 
39
    39
  • Thumbnail: Page 
40
    40
  • Thumbnail: Page 
41
    41
  • Thumbnail: Page 
42
    42
  • Thumbnail: Page 
43
    43