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Patterns within Patterns: Abundance-Size Relationships within the Hemiptera of Tropical Rain Forest or Why Phylogeny Matters

Ian D. Hodkinson and David S. Casson
Oikos
Vol. 88, No. 3 (Mar., 2000), pp. 509-514
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3546940
Page Count: 6
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Patterns within Patterns: Abundance-Size Relationships within the Hemiptera of Tropical Rain Forest or Why Phylogeny Matters
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Abstract

Our data are for a large composite sample of bugs (Insecta Hemiptera and Homoptera) from a tropical rain forest area in Sulawesi, Indonesia, collected by various sampling techniques at several representative localities over one year. We demonstrate how an overall relationship between log abundance and log body length in a large sample, which at first sight might appear to be of the polygonal form identified by Blackburn and Gaston, can be broken down into a consistent series of stronger linear relationships based around the composition of taxonomic clades with differing gradients. Furthermore, we show that the number of species within superfamily/family clades is negatively related to the mean body size of the clade, suggesting that taxa with a small body size tend to be represented by more species, thus further distorting the form of any overall relationship. The significance of these findings is discussed in the context of the current debate about species abundance, species size and distribution area relationships.

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