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Recovery from Monocular Deprivation in the Monkey. II. Reversal of Morphological Effects in the Lateral Geniculate Nucleus

L. J. Garey and F. Vital-Durand
Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
Vol. 213, No. 1193 (Nov. 24, 1981), pp. 425-433
Published by: Royal Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/35482
Page Count: 10
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Recovery from Monocular Deprivation in the Monkey. II. Reversal of Morphological Effects in the Lateral Geniculate Nucleus
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Abstract

The cross-sectional area was measured of neurons in the lateral geniculate nucleus (l.g.n.) of monkeys (Erythrocebus patas) subjected to monocular deprivation by unilateral eyelid suture, and of others in which the closed lids had been subsequently opened (either alone, `reopening', or together with closure of the previously open eye, `reverse suture'). Monocular deprivation for the first month of the monkey's life retards l.g.n. cell growth such that neurons in the laminae innervated by the closed eye are about 15% smaller in cross-sectional area than those in normally innervated laminae. This failure of normal growth can be countered by reverse suture for even short periods of time, the size difference between laminae being abolished within 6 days after reverse suture performed at the age of 1 month. Simply reopening the closed eye has little or no effect on l.g.n. neuronal recovery. These morphological results in the l.g.n. correlate closely with studies on the width of ocular dominance `stripes' in layer IV c of the visual cortex of the same animals: the stripes, narrower than normal after monocular deprivation, `expand' with a time course similar to that of l.g.n. cell recovery, as judged by single unit recording and by autoradiography in the cortex after transneuronal transport of labelled tracers injected in an eye.

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