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Journal Article

East Indians and Canada's New Immigration Policy

John R. Wood
Canadian Public Policy / Analyse de Politiques
Vol. 4, No. 4 (Autumn, 1978), pp. 547-567
DOI: 10.2307/3549977
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3549977
Page Count: 21
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East Indians and Canada's New Immigration Policy
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Abstract

This study investigates the political process leading to Bill C-24, The Immigration Act, 1976, and its consequences for the East Indians of Canada. Despite grassroots opposition to Third World immigration, the Act ultimately reflected a compromise which limited overall numbers of immigrants but accommodated the interests of East Indians and other minority ethnic groups by retaining a modified form of the 'nominated' selection category of independent relatives. An explanation of the compromise is sought by exploring the sensitivity of the Trudeau government to the indirect pressure of minority ethnic voters in unsafe parliamentary constituencies. It is concluded that East Indians currently derive benefits from the electoral influence of other immigrant groups. Their future position in Canadian society will nevertheless depend on their ability to overcome problems of community isolation and fragmentation. /// Cet article étudie le processus politique menant au projet de loi C-24, la loi d'immigration de 1976, et ses conséquences pour les immigrants provenant de l'Inde au Canada. Malgré l'opposition populaire à l'immigration en provenance du Tiers-Monde, la loi reflète finalement un compromis qui limite le nombre total d'immigrants, mais accommode les intérêts des Indiens et d'autres groupes ethniques minoritaires en conservant une forme modifiée de la catégorie de sélection 'désignée' de membres indépendants d'une même famille. Nous cherchons une explication au compromis en étudiant la sensibilité du gouvernement Trudeau aux pressions indirectes des électeurs appartenant à des minorités ethniques dans les circonscriptions parlementaires peu sûres. Nous concluons que les Indiens bénéficient actuellement de l'influence électorale d'autres groupes d'immigrants. Leur position future au sein de la société canadienne dépendra malgré tout de leur capacité à surmonter les problèmes d'isolement et de fragmentation dans la communauté.

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