Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

The Relation of Body Size to Plasma Levels of Estrogens and Androgens in Premenopausal Women (Maryland, United States)

Joanne F. Dorgan, Marsha E. Reichman, Joseph T. Judd, Charles Brown, Christopher Longcope, Arthur Schatzkin, Demetrius Albanes, William S. Campbell, Charlene Franz, Lisa Kahle and Philip R. Taylor
Cancer Causes & Control
Vol. 6, No. 1 (Jan., 1995), pp. 3-8
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3552885
Page Count: 6
  • Download ($43.95)
  • Cite this Item
The Relation of Body Size to Plasma Levels of Estrogens and Androgens in Premenopausal Women (Maryland, United States)
Preview not available

Abstract

We analyzed data from a cross-sectional study of 107 premenopausal women to evaluate the relations of height, weight, and body mass index (BMI) with plasma hormone levels. Participants were 20- to 40-year old women residing in Maryland (United States), whose reported menstrual cycle lengths were not more than 35 days and whose measured weights for height were 85 to 130 percent of 'desirable' based on 1983 Metropolitan Life Insurance tables. Fasting blood specimens were collected on each of days 5-7, 12-15, and 21-23 of every participant's menstrual cycle and pooled to create follicular, midcycle, and luteal phase samples, respectively, for analysis. Adjusted for age, taller women had significantly higher follicular-phase plasma-estradiol levels (percent difference/cm = 1.5, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 0.3-2.7, and heavier women had significantly lower plasma sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels averaged across the menstrual cycle phases (percent difference/kg = -1.2; CI = -1.9- -0.6). Body weight within the range studied, however, was not related significantly to the concentration of SHBG-bound estradiol during any phase of the menstrual cycle. The results of this cross-sectional study suggest a possible mechanism by which height may influence breast cancer risk.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8