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Liquidity Events and the Geographic Distribution of Entrepreneurial Activity

Toby E. Stuart and Olav Sorenson
Administrative Science Quarterly
Vol. 48, No. 2 (Jun., 2003), pp. 175-201
DOI: 10.2307/3556656
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3556656
Page Count: 27
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Liquidity Events and the Geographic Distribution of Entrepreneurial Activity
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Abstract

In this paper, we examine the ecological consequences of initial public offerings (IPOs) and acquisitions, specifically how the spatial distribution of these events influences the location-specific founding rates of new companies. We explore whether relatively small spatial units (metropolitan statistical areas) in close geographic proximity to firms that recently have been acquired or experienced an IPO exhibit high new venture creation rates and whether the magnitudes of these effects depend on regional differences in statutes governing the freedom of employees to move between employers. Count models of biotechnology firm foundings establish three findings: (1) IPOs of organizations located contiguous to or within an MSA accelerate the founding rate within that MSA, (2) acquisitions of biotech firms situated near to or within an MSA accelerate the founding rate within the MSA, but only when the acquirer enters from outside of the biotech industry, and (3) the enforceability of post-employment non-compete covenants, which is determined at the state level, strongly moderates these effects.

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