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Differential Dispersal Tendencies among Enallagma damselflies (Odonata) Inhabiting Different Habitats

Mark A. McPeek
Oikos
Vol. 56, No. 2 (Oct., 1989), pp. 187-195
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos
DOI: 10.2307/3565335
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3565335
Page Count: 9
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Differential Dispersal Tendencies among Enallagma damselflies (Odonata) Inhabiting Different Habitats
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Abstract

I examined the propensity and mechanism of dispersal for adults of Enallagma species (Odonata: Zygoptera) whose larvae are differentially able to survive in fishless and fish-containing lakes. Two species, found as larvae in fishless lakes, and two species, found as larvae in lakes supporting well-developed fish faunas, dispersed very few adults to adjacent lakes (≤ 1 km apart). Another species, found in winterkill lakes that periodically cycle between the fish-containing and fishless condition, dispersed large numbers of adults to adjacent lakes. The results of mark-release experiments suggested that the species inhabiting fishless lakes cannot discriminate between fishless and fish-containing lakes. Species differences in the propensity to disperse are attributed to the constancy of the fishless and fish-containing condition of the lakes inhabited by species. The mechanisms causing species differences in movement between lakes appear to be differences in their propensity to leave natal lakes, and not active selection of different lake types.

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