Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Impact of Observer Bias on Multivariate Analyses of Vegetation Structure

Arnie Gotfryd and Roger I. C. Hansell
Oikos
Vol. 45, No. 2 (Oct., 1985), pp. 223-234
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos
DOI: 10.2307/3565709
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3565709
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Impact of Observer Bias on Multivariate Analyses of Vegetation Structure
Preview not available

Abstract

Experimental data were used to evaluate the effects of subjectivity on habitat analyses. Multivariate vegetation observations were made by four observers who independently and repeatedly sampled a series of sites in an oak-maple forest. The data were analyzed univariately using analysis of variance and multivariately using principal component and discriminant function analyses. Observers significantly differed in their measurements on 18 of 20 vegetation variables. Transformation of variables and use of non-parametric methods did not mitigate observer effects whatsoever. Separate principal component analyses (PCA) of each observer's data yielded four sets of axes which weighted variables quite differently. The angular distance between the PCl axes of different observers got as high as 42°. Observer-specific PC ordinations showed that the sizes, shapes and relative positions of site surfaces were all highly variable among observers. Discriminant function analysis (DFA) was shown to be even more observer-sensitive than PCA. This was deduced from fluctuating variable weights and the angles between DFs. Classification success of discriminant models was impaired by observer bias. Some suggestions for field and analytic improvements are presented. /// Экспериментальные данные использовали для оценки зффекта субъективного нодхода при анализе местообитания. Проведены мультивариатные исследования растительности четыпьма надлюдателями, которые независимо друг от друга и последовательно собирали данные по сериям местообитаний в дубово-кленовом лесу. Полученные данные проанализированы с помощью унивариантного метода анализа вариации и мультивариантности с использованием основной компоненты и дискриминантного функционального анализа. Пазные наблюдатели существенно расходились в оценке 18 из 20 вариантов растительности. Трансформация вариантов и использование непараметрического метода не уменьшило зффекта индивидуальных особенностей наблюдателей. Отдельный анализ основных компонентов (PCA) данных каждого наблюдателя дал 4 серии осей, которые совершенно различно выявили разные варианты. Угол между осями PCI у разных наблюдателей доститал величины 42°. Ординация PC в зависимости от индивидуальности наблюдателя показала, сто размеры, форма, и относительное положение поверхностей местообитаний широко варьировали у разных наблюдателей. Дискриминационный функкциональный анализ (DFA) показал еще большую зависимость от характера наблюдателя, чем PCA. Это было уствновлено на основе взвешивания колеблющихся переменных и углов Между DFS. Классификационный успех дискриминантных моделей снижался в результате различий отдельных наблюдателей. Представлены некоторые соображения по усовершенствованию полевых и аналитических исследований.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
223
    223
  • Thumbnail: Page 
224
    224
  • Thumbnail: Page 
225
    225
  • Thumbnail: Page 
226
    226
  • Thumbnail: Page 
227
    227
  • Thumbnail: Page 
228
    228
  • Thumbnail: Page 
229
    229
  • Thumbnail: Page 
230
    230
  • Thumbnail: Page 
231
    231
  • Thumbnail: Page 
232
    232
  • Thumbnail: Page 
233
    233
  • Thumbnail: Page 
234
    234