Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Aboveground Biomass and Nutrient Dynamics of Calluna vulgaris and Molinia caerulea in a Dry Heathland

Rien Aerts
Oikos
Vol. 56, No. 1 (Sep., 1989), pp. 31-38
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos
DOI: 10.2307/3566084
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3566084
Page Count: 8
Were these topics helpful?
See somethings inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Aboveground Biomass and Nutrient Dynamics of Calluna vulgaris and Molinia caerulea in a Dry Heathland
Preview not available

Abstract

I tested the hypothesis that perennial plant species which replace each other when nutrient availability increases, are characterized by increasing productivity and nutrient (N and P) turnover. A two-year study was conducted in adjacent Dutch dry heathland stands dominated by the evergreen shrub Calluna vulgaris (characteristic of low-nutrient conditions) and the perennial deciduous grass Molinia caerulea, respectively. Molinia replaces Calluna when nutrient availability increases. Annual litter production (per unit of biomass) was higher in Molinia. However, aboveground nutrient turnover (annual nutrient loss per unit of biomass) of Calluna exceeded that of Molinia, because of a lower efficiency of nutrient-retranslocation from senescing plant parts. Aboveground productivity of Calluna was slightly lower or exceeded that of Molinia. Thus there is a discrepancy between the hypothesis and the results. Maximum aboveground productivity of Calluna and Molinia in Dutch heathlands is twice as high as in similar British stands. Data are presented which suggest that this is caused by higher atmospheric N-deposition levels in The Netherlands. It is concluded that the replacement of Calluna by Molinia in The Netherlands is the combined result of increased levels of nutrient availability and factors reducing the fitness of Calluna (heather beetle attacks, damage by frost).

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
31
    31
  • Thumbnail: Page 
32
    32
  • Thumbnail: Page 
33
    33
  • Thumbnail: Page 
34
    34
  • Thumbnail: Page 
35
    35
  • Thumbnail: Page 
36
    36
  • Thumbnail: Page 
37
    37
  • Thumbnail: Page 
38
    38
Part of Sustainability