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Radiosensitization of Mammalian Cells by Iodoacetamide and Related Compounds

D. K. Myers and Donna E. Slade
Radiation Research
Vol. 30, No. 2 (Feb., 1967), pp. 186-203
DOI: 10.2307/3572044
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3572044
Page Count: 18
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Radiosensitization of Mammalian Cells by Iodoacetamide and Related Compounds
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Abstract

The radiosensitivity of the cell membrane of rat erythrocytes and of rat thymocytes was increased by the presence of iodoacetamide (IAm) during X-irradiation. No evidence was obtained for an increase in the cell membrane damage that could be measured immediately after irradiation, in the form either of hemolysis, or of lipid peroxidation, or of susceptibility to Naja venom. Nevertheless, the membrane of cells irradiated in the presence of IAm appeared to deteriorate during subsequent incubation much more rapidly than those exposed to the same radiation dose in the absence of IAm. X-radiation induced a reaction of IAm with constituents of the cell membrane beside the thiols with which IAm normally reacts. This reaction occurred during, and possibly for a short time after, the exposure to X-radiation. Judging from experiments with model compounds, the radiation-induced reaction of IAm could involve almost every organic component of the cell membrane. The data suggest that the radiosensitization may reflect a stabilization of the radiation damage by reaction with IAm rather than an increase in the initial amount of radiation damage to the cell membrane.

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