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Marrow Infusions in Dogs Given Midlethal or Lethal Irradiation

E. D. Thomas, R. Leblond, T. Graham and R. Storb
Radiation Research
Vol. 41, No. 1 (Jan., 1970), pp. 113-124
DOI: 10.2307/3572900
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3572900
Page Count: 12
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Marrow Infusions in Dogs Given Midlethal or Lethal Irradiation
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Abstract

The question of harmful or beneficial effects of allogeneic marrow infusions was studied in dogs given 400, 500, or 600 R of whole-body irradiation from opposing 60 Co sources. After 400 R, 1 of 5 dogs not given marrow survived while 2 of 5 given allogeneic marrow survived. Ten dogs were given 500 R and 5 received allogeneic marrow and, similarly, 10 dogs were given 600 R and 5 were given allogeneic marrow. All animals in both groups died. A comparison of survival times, white blood cell and platelet counts, and marrow histology at all three radiation exposures showed no difference in the animals given marrow and the controls. Three dogs given 400, 500, or 600 R, followed by infusion of their own marrow, removed before irradiation, recovered promptly and survived. It was concluded that in this outbred species, allogeneic marrow given after midlethal or lethal irradiation is neither harmful nor beneficial. On the other hand, autologous marrow is effective in protecting against death in these animals. Genetic factors controlling histocompatibility differences appear to be of major importance in determining the outcome of marrow transplantation attempts in the 400 to 600 R range.

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