Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Diffusion of Oxygen in Bacterial Cells after Exposure to High Intensity Pulsed Electrons: Theoretical Model and Comparison with Experiment

Nikitas D. Kessaris, Herbert Weiss and Edward R. Epp
Radiation Research
Vol. 54, No. 2 (May, 1973), pp. 181-191
DOI: 10.2307/3573696
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3573696
Page Count: 11
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($10.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Diffusion of Oxygen in Bacterial Cells after Exposure to High Intensity Pulsed Electrons: Theoretical Model and Comparison with Experiment
Preview not available

Abstract

A biophysical model has been proposed in order to explain and predict the behavior of oxygen diffusion in bacterial cells after they have been rendered anoxic by a high intensity pulse of electrons. The model postulates the existence of a set of agents created by the radiation that slowly react with the diffusing oxygen. In so doing, the agents are neutralized and the oxygen molecules are prevented from reoxygenating the cells. The result is a transient absorption. The calculated oxygen concentration obtained from a modified diffusion equation gives adequate to good agreement with experiment. The model as applied to the experimental data yields numerical values for all physical parameters involved: the cellular diffusion coefficient, the interaction cross section, and the initial concentration of the oxygen-reacting agents. A nontrivial dependence of oxygen diffusion on dose and saturation oxygen concentration is also predicted.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
181
    181
  • Thumbnail: Page 
182
    182
  • Thumbnail: Page 
183
    183
  • Thumbnail: Page 
184
    184
  • Thumbnail: Page 
185
    185
  • Thumbnail: Page 
186
    186
  • Thumbnail: Page 
187
    187
  • Thumbnail: Page 
188
    188
  • Thumbnail: Page 
189
    189
  • Thumbnail: Page 
190
    190
  • Thumbnail: Page 
191
    191