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The Radiotoxicity of Iodine-125 in Mammalian Cells: II. A Comparative Study on Cell Survival and Cytogenetic Responses to 125 IUdR, ${}^{131}{\rm IUdR}$, and ${}^{3}{\rm HTdR}$

P. C. Chan, E. Lisco, H. Lisco and S. J. Adelstein
Radiation Research
Vol. 67, No. 2 (Aug., 1976), pp. 332-343
DOI: 10.2307/3574422
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3574422
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Radiotoxicity of Iodine-125 in Mammalian Cells: II. A Comparative Study on Cell Survival and Cytogenetic Responses to 125 IUdR, ${}^{131}{\rm IUdR}$, and ${}^{3}{\rm HTdR}$
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Abstract

Hydrogen-3, iodine-125, or iodine-131 was incorporated into cellular DNA in the form of thymidine or its analog 5-iodo-2-deoxyuridine. The effects of these radionuclides on cell survival and chromosomes were examined in the V79 Chinese hamster cell line. It was found that in terms of cell killing, iodine-125 was considerably more effective than iodine-131 and hydrogen-3. The mean radioactivity contents at 37% survival were 0.10, 1.16, and 1.64 pCi per cell for iodine-125, iodine-131, and hydrogen-3, respectively. Similarly, iodine-125 was much more effective in inducing chromosome aberrations than iodine-131 or hydrogen-3. For example, 0.1 pCi per cell of iodine-125 gave rise to three chromosome breaks per cell; it took 1.0 pCi per cell of iodine-131 or 1.7 pCi per cell of hydrogen-3 to produce the same effect. The cytogenetic consequences of irradiation by these radionuclides, which decay by disparate processes, were directly related to their lethal effects and strengthens the theory that radiation-induced cell death results from damage in chromatin structures.

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