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Effects of Lifetime Ingestion of 90 Sr in Beagle Dogs

Steven A. Book, William L. Spangler and Laura A. Swartz
Radiation Research
Vol. 90, No. 2 (May, 1982), pp. 244-251
DOI: 10.2307/3575702
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3575702
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effects of Lifetime Ingestion of 90 Sr in Beagle Dogs
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Abstract

To investigate the effects of lifetime 90 Sr ingestion, fifteen beagle dogs were fed 0.37, 1.11, or 3.33 μCi 90 Sr per gram of dietary calcium, equivalent to a daily intake of 1.3, 4, and 12 μCi 90 Sr, respectively. Exposures prior to weaning were made by maternal administration of one of the same 90 Sr levels, beginning at 21 days of gestation. Median survival was 12.5 years for the 1.3 μCi/day group, 6.5 years for the 4 μCi/day group, and 5.2 years for the 12 μCi/day group, compared to unirradiated control values of 14.5 to 15 years. The normal life span of more than half of the 1.3 μCi/day group is remarkable, considering they ingested 5900 to 7500 μCi 90 Sr during their lifetimes. One of seven 1.3 μCi/day dogs died of myeloproliferative syndrome (MPS), while one of four 4 μCi/day and one of four 12 μCi/day dogs died from MPS. In addition, another 12 μCi/day dog died of osteosarcoma and two others in the same group showed skeletal changes related to 90 Sr exposure. Other deaths were as could be expected in normal canine populations. Lifetime skeletal doses, determined by periodic whole-body counting, were 1990-3750, 1880-9230, and 6360-14,680 rad for the 1.3, 4, and 12 μCi/day groups, respectively. Comparison of these values with those from the large 90 Sr toxicity study at Davis in which 90 Sr feeding ended at 18 months of age indicates similar average skeletal doses from the two types of feeding regimens. The similarity of the skeletal doses may relate to the inability of 90 Sr to be incorporated to any great extent into a mature skeleton that no longer has the high calcium turnover associated with early life. As a result, deaths from lifetime 90 Sr ingestion appeared no earlier than when 90 Sr ingestion ended in early adulthood.

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