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Proton Therapy in Japan

Hiroshi Tsunemoto, Shinroku Morita, Tatsuo Ishikawa, Shigeo Furukawa, Kiyomitsu Kawachi, Tatsuaki Kanai, Hiroshi Ohara, Toshio Kitagawa and Tetsuo Inada
Radiation Research
Vol. 104, No. 2, Part 2: Supplement 8. Heavy Charged Particles in Research and Medicine (Nov., 1985), pp. S235-S243
DOI: 10.2307/3576653
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3576653
Page Count: 9
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Proton Therapy in Japan
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Abstract

There are two facilities for clinical trials with protons in Japan: the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, and the Particle Radiation Medical Science Center (PARMS), University of Tsukuba. At the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, patient treatment with the 70 MeV proton beam began in November 1979, and 29 patients were treated through December 1984. Of 11 patients who received protons only, 9 have had local control of the tumor. Two of the 9 patients, suffering from recurrent tumor after radical photon beam irradiation, developed complications after proton treatment. In the patients treated with photons or neutrons followed by proton boost, tumors were controlled in 12 of 18 patients (66.6%), and no complications were observed in this series. Malignant melanoma could not be controlled with the proton beam. A spot-beam-scanning system for protons has been effectively used in the clinical trials to minimize the dose to the normal tissues and to concentrate the dose in the target volume. At the Particle Radiation Medical Science Center, University of Tsukuba, treatment with a vertical 250 MeV proton beam was begun in April 1983, and 22 patients were treated through February 1984. Local control of the tumor was observed in 14 of 22 patients (63.6%), whereas there was no local control in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. There have been no severe complications in patients treated at PARMS. The results suggest that local control of tumors will be better with proton beams than with photon beams, whereas additional modalities are required to manage radioresistant tumors.

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