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Journal Article

Studies of the Mortality of A-Bomb Survivors: 8. Cancer Mortality, 1950-1982

Dale L. Preston, Hiroo Kato, Kenneth J. Kopecky and Shoichiro Fujita
Radiation Research
Vol. 111, No. 1 (Jul., 1987), pp. 151-178
DOI: 10.2307/3577030
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3577030
Page Count: 28
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Studies of the Mortality of A-Bomb Survivors: 8. Cancer Mortality, 1950-1982
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Abstract

This study extends an earlier one by 4 years (1979-1982) and includes mortality data on 11,393 additional Nagasaki survivors. Significant dose responses are observed for leukemia, multiple myeloma, and cancers of the lung, female breast, stomach, colon, esophagus, and urinary tract. Due to diagnostic difficulties, results for liver and ovarian cancers, while suggestive of significant dose responses, do not provide convincing evidence for radiogenic effects. No significant dose responses are seen for cancers of the gallbladder, prostate, rectum, pancreas, or uterus, or for lymphoma. For solid tumors, largely due to sex-specific differences in the background rates, the relative risk of radiation-induced mortality is greater for women than for men. For nonleukemic cancers the relative risk seen in those who were young when exposed has decreased with time, while the smaller risks for those who were older at exposure have tended to increase. While the absolute excess risks of radiation-induced mortality due to nonleukemic cancer have increased with time for all age-at-exposure groups, both excess and relative risks of leukemia have generally decreased with time. For leukemia, the rate of decrease in risk and the initial level of risk are inversely related to age at exposure.

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