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Radiation Carcinogenesis: Time-Dose Relationships

R. L. Ullrich, M. C. Jernigan, L. C. Satterfield and N. D. Bowles
Radiation Research
Vol. 111, No. 1 (Jul., 1987), pp. 179-184
DOI: 10.2307/3577031
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3577031
Page Count: 6
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Radiation Carcinogenesis: Time-Dose Relationships
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Abstract

The present studies were undertaken to examine the time-dose relationships for the induction of lung adenocarcinomas and mammary adenocarcinomas in female BALB/c mice following γ irradiation. Twelve-week-old female BALB/c/An NBd mice were irradiated with 137 Cs γ rays, and lifetime tumor incidences following high-dose-rate, low-dose-rate, or fractionated exposure regimens were compared. Analysis of the results indicated that the data could be fitted by linear-quadratic dose-response models for the induction of both tumors following acute doses and a linear model with a slope similar to that for the linear portion of the linear quadratic following low-dose-rate exposure regimens. When doses were fractionated the response was dependent upon the dose per fraction. If the dose per fraction was a dose which was predominantly on the linear portion of the acute dose response curve, then the response was linear and similar to that after low-dose-rate exposures. If the dose per fraction was in a region where the quadratic portion of the acute dose-response was significant, then the tumor incidence was higher than that following low-dose-rate exposures.

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