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Noninvolvement of the Heat-Induced Increase in the Concentration of Intracellular Free Ca2+ in Killing by Heat and Induction of Thermotolerance

Charles A. Vidair, Zhenhua Wang and William C. Dewey
Radiation Research
Vol. 124, No. 2 (Nov., 1990), pp. 156-164
DOI: 10.2307/3577860
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3577860
Page Count: 9
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Noninvolvement of the Heat-Induced Increase in the Concentration of Intracellular Free  Ca2+ in Killing by Heat and Induction of Thermotolerance
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Abstract

Mouse C3H 10T1/2 cells exhibited a two- to threefold increase in the concentration of free Ca2+ during heating at 45°C. The increase was maximal for a heat dose which was still in the shoulder region of the survival curve. The increase was fully reversible in heat-sterilized cells. By changing the concentration of extracellular Ca2+, it was possible to modulate the concentration of intracellular free Ca2+ in heated cells. Lowering the extracellular concentration to 0.03 mM reduced the baseline concentration of intracellular free Ca2+, and prevented it from increasing in heated cells to a level exceeding that of nonheated cells incubated in medium containing 2.0 or 5.0 mM Ca2+. Raising the concentration of extracellular Ca2+ to 15.0 mM raised the baseline, and resulted in a heat-induced increase in free Ca2+ which was twofold higher than that of cells heated in medium containing 2.0 or 5.0 mM Ca2+. An elevated concentration of intracellular free Ca2+ during and after heating did not potentiate thermal killing, nor did a reduced concentration during and after heating mitigate killing. Furthermore, the data argue against a heat-induced increase in free Ca2+ to some threshold level, which potentiates cell killing by some other parameter. In addition, cells heat-shocked in either 0.03 or 5.0 mM extracellular Ca2+, and then incubated in the same concentration for 12 h at 37°C, developed quantitatively similar amounts of tolerance to a second heating. The data suggest that the concentration of intracellular free Ca2+ does not play a critical role in thermal killing or the induction and development of thermotolerance.

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