Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

A Quantitative Model of DNA Fragments Generated by Ionizing Radiation, and Possible Experimental Applications

Vincent E. Cook and Robert K. Mortimer
Radiation Research
Vol. 125, No. 1 (Jan., 1991), pp. 102-106
DOI: 10.2307/3577988
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3577988
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($10.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Quantitative Model of DNA Fragments Generated by Ionizing Radiation, and Possible Experimental Applications
Preview not available

Abstract

We derive an equation for observed frequencies of DNA fragments as a function of size. In this derivation, we consider an experimental system where fragments are generated by random, independent double-strand breaks on chromosomes (or other large DNA molecules) and then separated by size on agarose gels. When visualizing these fragments using Southern hybridization techniques (employing a site-specific probe), we predict an intensity distribution that has unusual properties. In particular, peaks in the fragment size distribution depend not only on standard breakage parameters, but also on the location of the hybridization site. Our model is consistent with experimental and theoretical results reported elsewhere, where measurements of peaks are used for the physical mapping of genes. Further, we propose that similar experiments might be suitable for precise measurements of the parameters of double-strand breakage (as an alternative to neutral filter elutions and neutral sucrose gradients) and for testing the assumption of random, independent breakage for different types of radiation.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
102
    102
  • Thumbnail: Page 
103
    103
  • Thumbnail: Page 
104
    104
  • Thumbnail: Page 
105
    105
  • Thumbnail: Page 
106
    106