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On the Identity of the Damage Expressed by Treatment of X-Irradiated HeLa Cells with Different Agents

Karen L. Beetham and L. J. Tolmach
Radiation Research
Vol. 128, No. 2 (Nov., 1991), pp. 225-228
DOI: 10.2307/3578143
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3578143
Page Count: 4
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On the Identity of the Damage Expressed by Treatment of X-Irradiated HeLa Cells with Different Agents
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Abstract

To determine whether different agents that enhance the expression of potentially lethal X-ray damage (PLD) interact with the same or different lesions (or spectrum of lesions), cell killing was measured in three kinds of experiments: (1) When cells were irradiated in G1 phase and treated with caffeine or hydroxyurea at concentrations that yield maximal response, the same survival plateaus were reached. (2) Treatment of cells irradiated in G1 phase either with caffeine or with hydroxyurea so as to yield survival levels that differed twofold after 4 h incubation, followed by treatment with caffeine to allow expression of PLD in G2 phase, resulted eventually in the same level of survival. (3) When cells were irradiated and treated with caffeine, hydroxyurea, or 9-β-D-arabinofuranosyladenine (araA) after progressively longer delays, to trace the time course of recovery from the PLD, the responses obtained with caffeine and araA were similar; sensitivity to hydroxyurea was lost more rapidly. The results are consistent with the possibility that these three agents interact with the same lesions, but that different steps in the repair process are inhibited by caffeine or araA than by hydroxyurea.

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