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A Short History of the Radiation Chemistry of Water

Charles D. Jonah
Radiation Research
Vol. 144, No. 2 (Nov., 1995), pp. 141-147
DOI: 10.2307/3579253
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3579253
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Short History of the Radiation Chemistry of Water
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Abstract

The first hundred years of radiation studies have greatly clarified the chemical processes that are induced by radiation. While the fundamental ionization processes are similar in all systems, properties of the medium such as phase, polarity and composition can greatly affect the chemistry. In all systems, one needs to understand what chemical species are formed, what the internal energies are, how they are dispersed spatially, and what reactions can occur. In this review, the progress that has been made in understanding the chemistry that occurs after a radiolysis event for liquid water is outlined as an example of how progress has been made in radiation chemistry.

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