Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Radiation-Induced Chromosomal Instability in BALB/c and C57BL/6 Mice: The Difference Is as Clear as Black and White

B. Ponnaiya, M. N. Cornforth and R. L. Ullrich
Radiation Research
Vol. 147, No. 2 (Feb., 1997), pp. 121-125
DOI: 10.2307/3579411
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3579411
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($10.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Radiation-Induced Chromosomal Instability in BALB/c and C57BL/6 Mice: The Difference Is as Clear as Black and White
Preview not available

Abstract

Genomic instability has been proposed to be the earliest step in radiation-induced tumorigenesis. It follows from this hypothesis that individuals highly susceptible to induction of tumors by radiation should exhibit enhanced radiation-induced instability. BALB/c white mice are considerably more sensitive to radiation-induced mammary cancer than C57BL/6 black mice. In this study, primary mammary epithelial cell cultures from these two strains were examined for the "delayed" appearance of chromosomal aberrations after exposure to 137 Cs γ radiation, as a measure of radiation-induced genomic instability. As expected, actively dividing cultures from both strains showed a rapid decline of initial asymmetrical aberrations with time postirradiation. However, after 16 population doublings, cells from BALB/c mice exhibited a marked increase in the frequency of chromatid-type breaks and gaps which remained elevated throughout the time course of the experiment (28 doublings). No such effect was observed for the cells of C57BL/6 mice; after the rapid clearance of initial aberrations, the frequency of chromatid-type aberrations in the irradiated population remained at or near those of nonirradiated controls. These results demonstrate a correlation between the latent expression of chromosomal damage in vitro and susceptibility for mammary tumors, and provide further support for the central role of radiation-induced instability in the process of tumorigenesis.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
121
    121
  • Thumbnail: Page 
122
    122
  • Thumbnail: Page 
123
    123
  • Thumbnail: Page 
124
    124
  • Thumbnail: Page 
125
    125