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Determination of Thorium in Organs from Thorotrast Patients by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy and X-Ray Fluorescence

Yasuyuki Muramatsu, Yuichi Ishikawa, Satoshi Yoshida and Takesaburo Mori
Radiation Research
Vol. 152, No. 6, Supplement: The International Workshop on the Health Effects of Thorotrast, Radium, Radon and Other Alpha-Emitters 1999 (Dec., 1999), pp. S97-S101
DOI: 10.2307/3580123
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3580123
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Determination of Thorium in Organs from Thorotrast Patients by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy and X-Ray Fluorescence
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Abstract

Concentrations of thorium were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy in various organs collected from Japanese Thorotrast autopsy subjects to provide information on dosimetry for Thorotrast patients. Duplicate analyses were performed for 98 samples, and data for thorium in 27 different organs were obtained. The highest thorium level was found in spleen (mean: 16,000 μg/g wet weight), followed by liver (2100 μg/g wet weight) and bone marrow (600 μg/g wet weight). The other concentrations decreased in the following order: lymph node, gallbladder, testis, lung, small intestine, adrenal gland, pancreas, dura, esophagus, muscle, thyroid, large intestine, stomach, fat, kidney, urinary bladder, main artery, prostate, diaphragm, trachea, heart, cerebellum, cerebrum and intervertebral disk. The last four organs showed markedly low concentrations of 2-7 μg/g wet weight. Compared to the background thorium levels reported in the literature for human organs, the values for the organs from Thorotrast patients (even in the organs with the lowest concentrations) were at least several thousand times higher, suggesting the importance of also considering organs with minor deposition in dosimetry. Distributions of thorium in some selected organs were studied by microbeam X-ray fluorescence. The thorium conglomerates could be identified, and images of microdistributions of thorium in the organ slices were obtained.

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