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Gate-Keeping and Women's Health Seeking Behaviour in Navrongo, Northern Ghana

Pierre Ngom, Cornelius Debpuur, Patricia Akweongo, Philip Adongo and Fred N. Binka
African Journal of Reproductive Health / La Revue Africaine de la Santé Reproductive
Vol. 7, No. 1 (Apr., 2003), pp. 17-26
DOI: 10.2307/3583341
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3583341
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Gate-Keeping and Women's Health Seeking Behaviour in Navrongo, Northern Ghana
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Abstract

Among the Kassena-Nankana of northern Ghana, compound heads and husbands impede women's prompt access to modern health care. This paper shows that such gate-keeping systems have a negative effect on child survival. To investigate the social construction of compound-based gate-keeping systems, the authors relied on a series of qualitative interviews conducted in the Kassena-Nankana district. These data reveal that whilst compound heads are gate-keepers for spiritual reasons, husbands play such role for economic reasons. But more important, this article presents health interventions that are on trial in Navrongo (northern Ghana) and how they undermine such gate-keeping systems. /// Chez les Kassena-Nankana du Ghana du nord, les chefs de concessions et les maris entravent l'accès rapide des femmes aux services médicaux modernes. Cet article démontre que de tels systèmes de contrôle de passage ont un effet négatif sur la survie de l'enfant. Les auteurs se sont servis d'une série d'interviews qualitatifs recueillis dans de district de Kassena-Nankasa pour étudier la construction sociale des systèmes de contrôle de passage fondés sur les concessions. Ces données révèlent que les chefs de concessions jouent les rôles de gardiens de concession pour des raisons spirituelles et que les maris jouent les mêmes rôles pour des raisons économiques. Plus important encore, l'article présente les interventions médicales qui sont à l'essai actuellement à Navrongo (Ghana du nord) et comment elles ébranlent de tels systèmes de contrôle de passage.

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