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Rhetorical Sovereignty: What Do American Indians Want from Writing?

Scott Richard Lyons
College Composition and Communication
Vol. 51, No. 3 (Feb., 2000), pp. 447-468
DOI: 10.2307/358744
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/358744
Page Count: 22
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Rhetorical Sovereignty: What Do American Indians Want from Writing?
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Abstract

After years of colonization, oppression, and resistance, American Indians are making clear what they want from the heretofore compromised technology of writing. Rhetorical sovereignty, a people's control of its meaning, is found in sites legal, aesthetic, and pedagogical, and composition studies can both contribute to and learn from this work.

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