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What Do Parents Want from Schools? Evidence from the Internet

Mark Schneider and Jack Buckley
Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis
Vol. 24, No. 2 (Summer, 2002), pp. 133-144
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3594140
Page Count: 12
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What Do Parents Want from Schools? Evidence from the Internet
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Abstract

One of the most contentious policy areas in the United States today is the expansion of school choice. While many dimensions of parental-choice behavior have been analyzed, many of the most enduring questions center on the aspects of schools parents prefer and how these preferences will affect the socioeconomic and racial composition of schools. Using Internet-based methodological tools, we study parental preferences revealed through information search patterns and compare these findings to the standard ones in the literature, which are based largely on telephone interviews. Based on this evidence we suggest that unfettered choice may lead to undesirable outcomes in the distribution of students, and it may also lead to reduced pressure on schools to improve academic performance.

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