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Black Walnut (Juglans nigra Linnaeus) Response to Release and Fertilization on Strip-Mined Lands in Southeastern Kansas

Wayne A. Geyer, Gary G. Naughton and Nelson F. Rogers
Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science (1903-)
Vol. 82, No. 3 (1979), pp. 178-187
DOI: 10.2307/3627407
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3627407
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Black Walnut (Juglans nigra Linnaeus) Response to Release and Fertilization on Strip-Mined Lands in Southeastern Kansas
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Abstract

Black walnut plantations established in the mid 1930's have grown poorly on partially leveled strip-mined lands in southeastern Kansas. Observations about 42 years later revealed that the small amount of bur oak planted had less mortality and individual trees were larger than walnut. Dominant and codominant trees measured 7.4 and 11.0 in. diameter breast height (DBH), respectively for walnut and oak; and were 37 and 45 ft. tall. Walnut response to thinning operations increased diameter growth at least 100 percent. In an additional test diameter-growth response to single tree release (5-foot crown separation) equaled or exceeded the response to one spring application of nitrogen at 333 or 666 lbs/acre, without release of the trees. Both cultural practices were immediately effective and improved growth for 5 years. Release increased epicormic sprouting on the trunk while fertilization did not. Fertilized trees that were not released grew taller than those that were released.

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