Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Vegetation in the Flint Hills

John M. Briggs, Donna R. Rieck, Clarence L. Turner, Geoffrey M. Henebry, Douglas G. Goodin and M. Duane Nellis
Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science (1903-)
Vol. 100, No. 1/2 (Apr., 1997), pp. 10-20
DOI: 10.2307/3628435
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3628435
Page Count: 11
Were these topics helpful?
See somethings inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Vegetation in the Flint Hills
Preview not available

Abstract

In tallgrass prairie, complex interactions among multiple limiting resources in combination with a variety of land use practices can lead to a heterogeneous landscape. Remote-sensing data (AVHRR) were coupled with abiotic factors to explore spatial and temporal vegetation patterns of the Flint Hills in Kansas and Oklahoma. This information should enable the detection of both natural (e.g., interannual variation in precipitation and temperature) and anthropogenic (e.g., climate change, over-grazing, land-use practices) stresses on this grassland ecosystem. Shifts in the spatial and temporal patterns of vegetation (as measured from NDVI by AVHRR) have been correlated with meteorological data (from 117 weather stations) to identify key abiotic variables that determined vegetation patterns across this region. In 4 years, the combination of annual precipitation and growing degree days was useful to detect spatial and temporal vegetation patterns of the Flint Hills. However, it is imperative that land-use patterns are known in order to assess adequately spatial and temporal patterns of vegetation in this area.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[10]
    [10]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
Part of Sustainability