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Navajo Coresidential Kin Groups and Lineages

David F. Aberle
Journal of Anthropological Research
Vol. 37, No. 1 (Spring, 1981), pp. 1-7
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3629511
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Navajo Coresidential Kin Groups and Lineages
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Abstract

Among the Navajo there is a level of residential aggregation above the camp, here called the "co-residential kin group" or "CKG," the core of which is a coresident portion of a matrilineage. This lineage exhibits its corporate character in the defense of land against adjacent, potentially encroaching neighboring units. Segmentation over time affects both lineages and CKGs. Lineages are of long duration among the Navajo, but were not always units of land defense. Although partly similar analyses go back nearly forty years, some fieldworkers deny the existence of one or both of these units. Answers to a series of questions that can be investigated in the field might resolve the differences.

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