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Some Notes on Failure in Researching Sport and Coaching Writing

Linda Kittell
Rocky Mountain Review of Language and Literature
Vol. 59, No. 2 (2005), pp. 81-88
DOI: 10.2307/3655049
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3655049
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Some Notes on Failure in Researching Sport and Coaching Writing
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Abstract

This article is based on a talk given by the author, a Senior Instructor of English at Washington State University, to the Honors College in April 2005 as part of the Invited Lecture Series. The title comes from a discussion she overheard between two students. One student was trying to convince her boyfriend to go to Nobel Prize Laureate Wole Soylinka's poetry reading. She kept repeating, "But Travis, he won the Noble Prize." This got the author thinking about "noble" prizes, that although they may be more readily available than Nobel Prizes, they are not less important. There's a lot about basketball here, a little about baseball, some about teaching writing, and a couple of peafowl tossed in.

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