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Comparative Ecology of the Kinosternid Turtles of Oklahoma

I. Y. Mahmoud
The Southwestern Naturalist
Vol. 14, No. 1 (May 16, 1969), pp. 31-66
DOI: 10.2307/3669247
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3669247
Page Count: 36
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Comparative Ecology of the Kinosternid Turtles of Oklahoma
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Abstract

A comparative ecological study was conducted on kinosternid turtles (Kinosternon subrubrum hippocrepis, Kinosternon flavescens flavescens, Sternothaerus odoratus, and Sternothaerus carinatus carinatus) in Oklahoma from 1956 to 1960. Habitat, temperature, movements, diel cycle periodicity and growth were investigated from seven natural populations. Laboratory observations on habitat preference and temperature were studied. Kinosternon flavescens prefers temporary bodies of water, such as mudholes and farm ponds, while Sternothaerus odoratus and Sternothaerus carinatus prefer permanent running water as rivers and creeks. Kinosternon subrubrum has a broad preference for habitats and is found in almost any type of water. The thermoactivity range was broader in Sternothaerus than in Kinosternon. Sternothaerus has a longer annual activity period than Kinosternon. Light intensity is perhaps an important factor influencing diel cycle, since these turtles are photophobic. The patterns of movement in the turtles indicated limited activity ranges. The growth rate is faster in turtles with carapace lengths between 2 and 6 cm, after which the growth decreases rapidly.

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