Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Aspects of the Natural History of the Rough Green Snake, Opheodrys aestivus (Colubridae)

Steven K. Goldsmith
The Southwestern Naturalist
Vol. 29, No. 4 (Nov. 14, 1984), pp. 445-452
DOI: 10.2307/3670997
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3670997
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Aspects of the Natural History of the Rough Green Snake, Opheodrys aestivus (Colubridae)
Preview not available

Abstract

Opheodrys aestivus was observed and collected at several locations in central Oklahoma. This species prefers a narrow arboreal microhabitat of dense brush in edge situations. This microhabitat is found in a variety of habitats, such as lakeshores, streambanks, upland ravines, and forest edges. Rough green snakes are able to live away from standing water by sucking droplets of dew from leaves. Green snakes exhibit little sexual dimorphism in relative tail length, indicative of adaptation for arboreality in body proportions. The snake's green coloration has a camouflaging and possibly a countershading effect, which is enhanced by its habit of freezing when approached. The response to body contact by other snakes or by humans appears to be a predator defense mechanism. Ten egg clutches had an average of 5.5 eggs. Six gravid females laid eggs in the laboratory. The mean incubation period was 41 days. Twentynine hatchlings had an average of 142 mm body length and 210 mm total length. Sexual dimorphism among hatchlings was insignificant. Two clutches of eggs were found in rotting logs.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[445]
    [445]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
446
    446
  • Thumbnail: Page 
447
    447
  • Thumbnail: Page 
448
    448
  • Thumbnail: Page 
449
    449
  • Thumbnail: Page 
450
    450
  • Thumbnail: Page 
451
    451
  • Thumbnail: Page 
452
    452