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Silence as a Defense against Predatory Bats in Two Species of Calling Insects

Hayward G. Spangler
The Southwestern Naturalist
Vol. 29, No. 4 (Nov. 14, 1984), pp. 481-488
DOI: 10.2307/3671001
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3671001
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Silence as a Defense against Predatory Bats in Two Species of Calling Insects
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Abstract

Males of both the lesser wax moth, Achroia grisella (F.) and the bush katydid (Insara covilleae Rehn and Habard), call mates with high-frequency sound audible to insectivorous bats. Both insects cease acoustical mate calling when they hear the cries of either an approaching bat or a similar artificially-produced sound. But, the lesser wax moth sometimes continues to call by producing pheromone, but not sound. Both insects resume acoustical calling either soon after a bat has passed or after the artificial sound is removed.

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