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Endoparasites of Crotaphytus collaris collaris (Sauria: Iguanidae) from Arkansas

Chris T. McAllister and Stanley E. Trauth
The Southwestern Naturalist
Vol. 30, No. 3 (Aug. 28, 1985), pp. 363-370
DOI: 10.2307/3671268
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3671268
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Endoparasites of Crotaphytus collaris collaris (Sauria: Iguanidae) from Arkansas
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Abstract

Endoparasites of 273 Crotaphytus collaris collaris were identified from lizards collected in Arkansas during the 1971-72 and 79-80 activity seasons. A larval spirurid nematode, Abbreviata sp., not identifiable to species was found in the stomach of almost half of the lizards examined. Abbreviata sp. was common in adult lizards, uncommon in juveniles and absent in hatchlings. It appears that C. c. collaris ingests an arthropod intermediate host and Abbreviata sp. are unable to mature. Collared lizards represent paratenic or second intermediate hosts in this life cycle scheme and the most likely definitive hosts are predators of C. c. collaris. A linstowiidean eucestode, Oochoristica sp., also infected collared lizards but was found in the duodenum of only 2.9% of the lizards examined. The intermediate host of this Oochoristica tapeworm is unknown, but presumably is an arthropod. Complete classification of Oochoristica sp. awaits further study since measurements of the scolex, strobila, suckers, cirrus sac and testes did not approximate those measurements of species previously described. Information on seasonal and county distribution of the helminths are also presented.

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