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Journal Article

Status of Leopard Frogs (Rana pipiens Complex: Ranidae) in Arizona and Southeastern California

Robert W. Clarkson and James C. Rorabaugh
The Southwestern Naturalist
Vol. 34, No. 4 (Dec., 1989), pp. 531-538
DOI: 10.2307/3671513
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3671513
Page Count: 8

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Topics: Frogs, Rivers, Valleys, Species, Natural history museums, Canyons, Lakes, Streams, Fish, Amphibians
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Status of Leopard Frogs (Rana pipiens Complex: Ranidae) in Arizona and Southeastern California
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Abstract

A sample of literature and museum localities of leopard frogs (Rana pipiens complex) was surveyed in Arizona and Imperial Valley, California, from 1983 to 1987. We found Rana chiricahuensis at only two of 36 localities which previously supported the species in the 1960s and 1970s; two new localities are reported. For 13 of 28 literature localities surveyed for R. pipiens, none were found to be inhabited, although one previously unreported population was discovered. Rana blairi was found at two of six literature localities surveyed, and a new population is reported. Rana yavapaiensis could not be found in Imperial Valley and the lower Colorado River, Arizona-California, but populations in upland Arizona are relatively intact. Introduced Rana berlandieri has replaced R. yavapaiensis along the Colorado and Gila rivers, Arizona. These apparent losses represent additional decimation of an increasingly endangered North American ranid fauna.

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