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Journal Article

Distribution and Habitat Use of the Pacific Treefrog (Pseudacris regilla) on the Lower Colorado River and in Arizona

James C. Rorabaugh, Jeffrey M. Howland and Randall D. Babb
The Southwestern Naturalist
Vol. 49, No. 1 (Mar., 2004), pp. 94-99
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3672274
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Distribution and Habitat Use of the Pacific Treefrog (Pseudacris regilla) on the Lower Colorado River and in Arizona
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Abstract

Prior to 1987, the Pacific treefrog (Pseudacris regilla) was known from only 4 sites on the lower Colorado River, which borders Nevada, California, and Arizona. We conducted surveys on the lower Colorado River from Princess Cove on Lake Mohave to the Bill Williams River confluence and upstream on the Bill Williams River to Planet Ranch from 1987 through 2002, and we consulted museums and herpetologists working in the area for P. regilla localities. We found this frog to be well distributed along 90 km of the lower Colorado River and its backwaters from Davis Camp, just below Davis Dam, to Castle Rock in upper Lake Havasu. We report 33 new localities and confirmed presence at 1 historical site. We found P. regilla primarily in cattail and bulrush marshes along the main channel and in backwaters. What limits its distribution on the lower Colorado River is unknown, because cattail and bulrush marshes occur both north and south of the current range. Pseudacris regilla populations below Davis Dam are probably currently disjunct from those on the Overton Arm of Lake Mead and in the Las Vegas Valley. In Arizona, this species also has been recorded as an apparent introduction at Middle Spring and a nearby stock tank in the Virgin Mountains, Mohave County, and at 2 central Arizona plant nurseries. The species persisted for at least 19 years and successfully bred at 1 nursery, where it was reportedly introduced by frogs hitchhiking on ornamental plants imported from San Diego. /// Antes de 1987, la rana arbórea, Pseudacris regilla, se conocía en sólo 4 sitios en el bajo río Colorado, que linda con Nevada, California y Arizona. Hicimos muestreos en el bajo río Colorado desde Princess Cove en el Lake Mohave hasta la confluencia del río Bill Williams y río arriba en el río Bill Williams hasta Planet Ranch durante 1987-2002 y consultamos los museos y a los herpetólogos trabajando en el área por localidades de P. regilla. Encontramos esta rana bien distribuida en los 90 km del bajo río Colorado y su remanso desde Davis Camp, justo abajo de Davis Dam, hasta Castle Rock en la parte superior del Lake Havasu. Registramos 33 nuevas localidades y confirmamos su presencia en 1 sitio histórico. Encontramos P. regilla principalmente en pantanos de aneas y tules al lado del canal principal y en los remansos. Lo que limita la distribución de la rana en el bajo río Colorado es desconocido, porque pantanos de aneas y tules ocurren tanto al norte como al sur de su distribución actual. Poblaciones de P. regilla debajo Davis Dam probablemente están separadas actualmente de las de Overton Arm de Lake Mead y las de Las Vegas Valley. En Arizona, esta especie también se ha registrado como una introducción aparente en Middle Spring y en un tanque cercano para ganadería en las Virgin Mountains, condado de Mohave, y en 2 viveros en Arizona central. La especie persistió por lo menos 19 años y se reprodujo éxitosamente en un vivero, donde fue introducida aparentemente por transporte en plantas ornamentales importadas de San Diego.

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