Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Effects of a Flood on Relative Abundance and Diversity of Small Mammals in a Regenerating Bottomland Hardwood Forest

Michael J. Chamberlain and Bruce D. Leopold
The Southwestern Naturalist
Vol. 48, No. 2 (Jun., 2003), pp. 306-309
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3672335
Page Count: 4
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effects of a Flood on Relative Abundance and Diversity of Small Mammals in a Regenerating Bottomland Hardwood Forest
Preview not available

Abstract

Because effects of flooding on small mammal populations are poorly understood, we examined small mammal response, measured by relative abundance and community diversity, to a flood in a regenerating bottomland hardwood forest. We trapped small mammals immediately prior to and 5 months following retreat of floodwaters in Yazoo County, Mississippi during 1994 and 1995. Cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) and marsh rice rats (Oryzomys palustris) were the dominant species captured throughout the study, but abundance declined markedly after flooding and did not reach pre-flood abundance by the end of the study. Extended flood duration and depth were believed to have caused the disappearance of cotton mice (Peromyscus gossypinus) and a decrease in community diversity. /// Porque no se sabe mucho del efecto de las inundaciones sobre las poblaciones de mamíferos pequeños, examinamos la respuesta de los mamíferos pequeños, según la abundancia relativa y la diversidad de la comunidad, a una inundación en un bosque de madera dura en proceso de regeneración de tierras bajas. Capturamos los mamíferos pequeños inmediatamente antes de la inundación y 5 meses después del retiro de las aguas en el condado de Yazoo, Mississippi, en los años 1994 y 1995. La rata algodonera (Sigmodon hispidus) y la rata arrocera (Oryzomys palustris) fueron las especies capturadas con mayor frecuencia. Su abundancia bajó sumamente después de la inundación, y hasta el fin del estudio no se había alcanzado la abundancia anterior. Se cree que las prolongadas inundaciones y la profundidad de las aguas causaron la desaparición del ratón algodonero (Peromyscus gossypinus) y la disminución de la diversidad de la comunidad.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
306
    306
  • Thumbnail: Page 
307
    307
  • Thumbnail: Page 
308
    308
  • Thumbnail: Page 
309
    309