If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Influence of Predation by Mountain Lions on Numbers and Survivorship of a Feral Horse Population

John W. Turner, Jr. and Michael L. Morrison
The Southwestern Naturalist
Vol. 46, No. 2 (Jun., 2001), pp. 183-190
DOI: 10.2307/3672527
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3672527
Page Count: 8
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Influence of Predation by Mountain Lions on Numbers and Survivorship of a Feral Horse Population
Preview not available

Abstract

In an effort to expand our knowledge of the ecology of feral horses (Equus caballus), we initiated a study of the Montgomery Pass Wild Horse Territory (MPWHT), located along the California-Nevada border at the northern end of the White Mountains. We report on 11 years (1987-1997) of data on numbers, productivity, and survivorship of the feral horse population in the MPWHT. The majority of the MPWHT is located in pinyon-juniper (Pinus-Juniperus) woodland. The adult horse population averaged 150 individuals, with a significant decrease occurring across the study. The number of foals born ranged between 29 and 35 through 1993, dropped to 22 to 24 for 1994-1996, and rebounded to 31 in 1997. Although mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) are the primary prey of mountain lions (Felis concolor), extensive predation on foals occurred in MPWHT. The average number of foals killed each year by mountain lions was 13.5 (45.1% of foals produced). There was a significant difference in the proportion of foals killed by coat color relative to the distribution of colors born into the population. Annual survival (May to April) rate for foals averaged 0.32, ranging from a low of 0.23 during 1987-1988, to a high of 0.48 in 1996-1997. Yearling survival averaged 0.88, ranging from a low of 0.5 in 1994-1995, to a high of 1.0 in 5 of the annual periods. Adult survivorship averaged 0.92, ranging from a low of 0.81 in 1992-1993, to a high of 1.0 in 4 of the annual periods. The lion population was 4 to 5 from 1987 through 1991, increased to 8 in 1992, and then slowly decreased through 1996. Number of lions dropped to 3 animals in 1997. The resident mountain lion population is significantly influencing number of horses in the MPWHT, primarily through predation of foals. Increased foal survival during the latter part of our study, and especially during 1997, was apparently related to a substantial decrease in number of lions. /// En un intento de ampliar nuestro conocimiento de la ecología de los caballos salvejas (Equus caballus) iniciamos un estudio del Territorio de los Caballos Montgomery Pass Wild Horse Territory (MPWHT), localizada al noroeste de las Montañas Blancas a lo largo de la frontera de los estados de California y Nevada. Reportamos 11 años de datos entre 1987-1997 de la abundancia, la productividad, y la sobrevivencia en la población de los caballos salvajes en el MPWHT. La mayoría del MPWHT esta localizada en bosques piñon-cedro (Pinus-Juniperus). El promedio del tamaño de la población de caballos adultos fue de 150 individuos, con una significativa disminución a través del estudio. El número aproximado de crías nacidas fue entre 29 y 35 durante 1993, disminuyó a 22-24 en 1994-1996, y aumentó después a 31 en 1997. Aunque el venado mula (Odocoileus hemionus) es la presa principal del león de la montaña (Felis concolor), depredación extensiva de las crías ocurrió en MPWHT. El promedio de crías matadas en cada año por leones de la montaña fue 13.5 (ó 45.1% de las crías producidas). Hubo una diferencia significativa en la proporción de crías matadas por el color de la piel en relacion a la distribución de colores nacidos en la población. La tasa de sobrevivencia anual de (de mayo a abril) para crías fue un promedio de 0.32, de una tasa mínimade 0.32 crías sobrevivientes 0.23 a 0.24 durante 1987-1989, a un a máxima de 0.48 en 1996-1997. El promedio de la sobrevivencia de los jovenes de un año fue anual 0.88 de un mínimo de 0.5 en 1994-1995, a un máximo de 1.0 en 5 períodos anuales. El promedio de la sobrevivencial anual de los adultos fue 0.92, de un mínimo de 0.81 en 1992-1993 a un máximo de 1.0 en 4 períodos anuales. La población de los leones fue de 4-5 animales de 1987 a 1991, aumentó a 8 animales en 1992, después disminuyó lentamente a hasta 1996. La población bajó a 3 animales en 1997. Nuestro estudio indica que la poblacion residente del león de la montaña influye significativamente en el número de caballos en el MPWHT, principalmente por la depredación de las crías. La mejor sobrevivencia de las crías durante la última parte de nuestro estudio, especialmente during 1997, a lo mejor serelaciono a la sustancial diminución de número de los leones.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[183]
    [183]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
184
    184
  • Thumbnail: Page 
185
    185
  • Thumbnail: Page 
186
    186
  • Thumbnail: Page 
187
    187
  • Thumbnail: Page 
188
    188
  • Thumbnail: Page 
189
    189
  • Thumbnail: Page 
190
    190